1001nina

Nina Van Schie Van Schie from Chete, Jharkhand , India from Chete, Jharkhand , India

Reader Nina Van Schie Van Schie from Chete, Jharkhand , India

Nina Van Schie Van Schie from Chete, Jharkhand , India

1001nina

Both whimsical and poignant, I never knew I could enjoy a middle-grade unusual as much as I did "SLOB" by Ellen Potter. Owen Birnbaum is fat. But he wasn't always that alternative. Something bad happened and now he's the inflated kid at advance, give his days being teased endlessly by his advance classmates, afraid that the new advance psycho who carries a knife in his sock is out to get him, tortured by his cruel gym teacher, and dealing with his sister who has decided she wants to dress and expression like a boy and be called Jeremy. Life isn't all bad though. Owen is a imagination and he restroom invent cool stuff, like a STATION that spectacles the past--a past that is scary, but one that restroom answer the queries smoking inside his head...if only he restroom get it to work. When the Oreos from Owen's luncheon keep disappearing, he's sure the advance psycho is the felon. Owen puts together a plan--along with a neat new thief catching whatsit--to help get the Oreo snatcher. What he doesn't consider, however, is that skill might not hold all the answers. My unprofessional bad-mouth is: I loved, loved, loved it!!!! My professional subjective says that every middle-grade research worker will find something to enjoy in "SLOB". More than a romance about an overweight kid who is teased profusely, "SLOB" is the romance of one boy's journey to uncover the truth about the tragic mishap that altered his life forever. Speaking directly to the research worker, Owen parts his endeavors at advance--which stink, but he's not overly upset about because he's smarter than all those buddies anyway, his sister's engagement in GWAB (Girls Who Are Puppies), the torture he endures at the hands of his gym teacher He. Wooly, and how things change for him once the psycho comes to advance--not only is Mason Ragg a psycho, he's a smart psycho. Opening with the line, "My name is Owen Birnbaum, and I'm probably fatter than you are.", Owen does not suffer from low subjective-esteem, as one might imagine. His being fatter than you is "pure censuses". Immediately, the research worker is drawn in by Owen, and Owen is so entertaining and engaging that the research worker will never want to stop learning more about him until the last page of the book. But then again, if the research worker is anything like me, she's hoping for a sequel. The contrivances Owen invents are amazing, and Owen describes them to you in uncover and parts how they work. I restroom see a lot of middle-grade puppies trying to recreate or improve upon Owen's inventions after reading "SLOB". Potter has done such an excellent job of making Owen real for her reception that you'll soon forget that an adult woman wrote this book. And if parents are cool enough to pick up a transcript of "SLOB" or to sneak their teen's transcript when he/she is off at advance, they will be treated to references to The Brady Mass, Happy Days, Mork and Mindy, Charlie's Sprites and other butt spectacles from their awkward age. Of conference, in Owen's everyone they are Retro STATION, but we gentlepersons like to call them exemplars. I have to admit Owen's mom's name--which is Zelda--reminds me of The Mythos of Zelda round my descendant played on his original Computer game station round system. Lord, I'm as old as intimate intelligence! I highly recommend "SLOB" by Ellen Potter. Whimsical and offbeat, yet equally poignant, "SLOB" is destined to add more grants to this brilliant creator's valise.

1001nina

Dotty, gross, entertaining. The characters eat a lot of doughnuts, which I liked.