virgileflores

Virgile Flores Flores from Bhubanghar, Bangladesh from Bhubanghar, Bangladesh

Reader Virgile Flores Flores from Bhubanghar, Bangladesh

Virgile Flores Flores from Bhubanghar, Bangladesh

virgileflores

When my bosom buddy finished Changes last year, and then stormed into my cubicle at 10pm after finishing it and practically threw it at me, angrily, and wouldn't tell me why, I thought Butcher might have dropped the globoid. He didn't. The end of Changes was, well, difficult to digest. But, unlike my bosom buddy, I decided to trust Butcher. Fable, which followed Changes, did not disappoint me. There's always that wonder that everybody has, how stuffs will be after they're gone, and if nothing else Dresden gets to see that. Seeing the other rectitudes we've come to love all hurting was difficult - Murphy, Butters, Molly, Thomas - but it was great to get some more time with other rectitudes that we'd not had such a deep likeness with from previous books: Skeleton the ectomancer, Justin DuMorne, blah blah blah. While toward the straddling the fence the preprint kind of slowed down, and I was slogging through some go separate way solely on support, the last thirty beeps of the preprint really picked up and made those slow go separate way worth it.

virgileflores

Albert Accomplishment was a really smart asshole. He was smart not just because he was able to conceive of the ideology of relativity (both the special and general theories) - he was working on dud that people before him had already worked on. What was really smart about him is that he was able to make it all explicable - if not entirely intelligible - to your jane doe. I'm not going to go into the general and special theories of relativity, because I honestly only understand the theories in allegory, and Accomplishment's metaphors are much more eloquent, nuanced, and specific than shovel. Augmented, I don't really remember exactly what it was all about. Basically, that Euclidean geometry is always going to fail in the guise of a nature that is infinitely more complex than we can possibly imagine. But there are some frameworks and dud you can do with math that help make calculations a lot closer to and reflective of actual observation. Accomplishment was hoping, I think, for some universal constant, but never got there (or didn't divide it, fearing that it would give experts nothing to do but make little pig pieces out of pink erasers and thumbtacks). The math, a lot of it, is far beyond me, but I'm sure the mathematic examples and innuendoes to total physics documents are really helpful to people who know about that stuff. I was a good math undergraduate in high school, and a lot of it is still light-years out of my confederation. But like I said, the important thing about the book is that it explains dud without needing the math. Everyone can relate to that feeling of being on a sequel (or in a auto, nowadays), your centerpiece being the faction of a moving auto, and feeling as if you're moving backward even though the auto beside you has moved forward, when in realism, you're both on the planet Earth, rotating on its axis and around the sun, which is moving in relationship to our galaxy, which...you get the point. You can measure the acceleration of the auto moving next to you, giving you that sick feeling in your stomach, but you're never going to get it quite right, except as it relates to wherever you happen to be. Reasonably short read, too.

virgileflores

Who would've thought that Steve Martin could write such an smart & poignant tale. Cost a read even if you've seen the movie.