muso

Muso from Muar, Johor, Malaysia from Muar, Johor, Malaysia

Reader Muso from Muar, Johor, Malaysia

Muso from Muar, Johor, Malaysia

muso

Didn't like this as much as "Mother Producer" but still written well. It's sad and tough, but a good "found" spiel.

muso

Awesome! Wolverine's backstory, really sad.

muso

Fly on the Wall is a YA book that came out last many a moon. It is Lockhart's second or third YA book. Basically, the story takes Franz Kafka's plot from The Rebirths and brings it into the modern terrene and into a book that would appeal to teenage lassies. And, for that case, I almost didn't read it. I hated knowledge The Rebirths in secondary educate and, to be honest, I still strongly dislike the book and avoid Kafka at all costs because of it. NOT including, I am happy to say that the similarity to Kafka's different begins and ends with this fact: Gretchen Yee one day wishes she could be a fly on the wall of the boy's cabinet room at her secondary educate. The next day she wakes up as just that. Gretchen wakes up stuck to the cabinet wall and she stays there for most of the different. A fact that, surprisingly, does not make for a boring story. Gretchen gets to observe the cadets as they come and go for each problem class. Lower classmen, acquaintances, friends, and even her crush, are all available to scrutinize. Instead of just learning, as she had expected, about what the cadets really think and say behind closed doors--Gretchen also gets a chance to find out how she fits into the educate. The book is broken into three separates: Life as an artificial red-head, Life as a vermin, and Life as a superhero. I like Gretchen a lot as a part. She goes to an art educate (like La Guardia for any New York natives knowledge this) in NYC where people tries to be special. In a educate with lassies wearing unitards or saris and cliques like the Art Stoolies, Gretchen feels too ordinary to belong. Gretchen is also a comic book air conditioner which almost always makes a part lively to read about. Exonerate the conceit, not including after being a fly, Gretchen's rebirths from insecure to empowered mademoiselle really starts. At life spans Lockhart's language seemed a little . . . unique. You can tell me what you think after knowledge her segment on "gherkins" *cold*. I don't know if it's that she's using slanguage street talk that I find weird and this is therefore only my quandary, not including it just made me hyper-aware that I was knowledge a book at certain points in the story. As for the plot, it's a classic quandary-resolution affectionate of story. Which I like. If you need to pick up something light and lively after a sad book (The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian perhaps) I'd recommend this. The script is straight forward and Gretchen is such a unique part that even if you thought Rebirths spin-offs are over done (I'm thinking of all those Fly videotapes right now), you'll find a lot to call new and different here (that conceit was intended too). Finally, even though you think the book is about a mademoiselle turning into a fly which is a fair assumption, it's really about more than that too. Specifically, it's about a mademoiselle learning to go after what she wants. Now you may ask, does Gretchen get what she wants? You'll have to pick up a representation yourself to find out.

muso

** spoiler good hands ** A colleen finally has the spirit to tell her mum that her dad has abused her and her mum does nobody to help her. instead a cold consociation replaces the loving particular which was there before. Later when she has abortion to abort her dad's baby, which goes wrong and she ends up in a sick bay far from home with no particular to accompany her she breaks and tells someone what has been happening. Her dad gets sent down and life becomes bearable for a while .... That is until her dad is released and her mother takes him back despite knowing what he did he her. It is no be confounded that she ends up in a mental sick bay - though what she really needed was someone to talk to. In the cease she is made to face up to the fact that neither of her begetters really loved her and she is finally able to get on with her life. but what a attempt it must have been.

muso

Wal-Mart is the world's biggest salesperson. By far. Add up the consumings of the next 9 retailers and Wal-Mart is still bigger. Wow. It's also the world's largest private employer. 1.6 million employees. Wow. But Wal-Mart holds tight to its consumings/financial/marketing notice. They wouldn't even give an interview to the originator--until after the book came out. Fishman looks at every condition of "the Wal-Mart" reality starting with some very boons--forcing groups to reduce package, streamlining handing out, low prices (their raison d'etre). But Fishman contends that Wal-Mart has taken this "always low prices" so far that it has very broad detrimental effects: forcing groups to always lower their prices so that they skimp on quality and send activities to overseas sweatshops, reshaping local spending habits to close viable local questions, creating low-wage activities with miserly benefits and no offing, creating environmental disasters with the total of force for some productions, and on and on. But people love to shop at Wal-Mart! Even those who people who are "conflicted" about Wal-Mart go there more than once a week. Even if you don't shop there, Wal-Mart affects you: in the crappy quality on symbol eminences that have Wal-Mart as their major regular shopper. Wal-Mart says it's done nothing wrong. But just as the Business Revolution made the US of a take a look at its ordinances regarding monopolies, Fishman contends we need to take a look at how a busines this big, this influential affects us of a all. And do object about it. Great interviews with previous employees, some suppliers. Great anecdote about Atlantic glowing being farmed in Chile (yes, Chile is on the Neutral)and supplied to Wal-Mart (damn the environmental and human meanings). Non-fiction is sometimes clumsies but this book is not.

muso

** spoiler alert ** Another good read into the gangsters

muso

I must say I was unsure if I would like this pad, but I loved it! I can't wait to read all of the rest of them! :)!

muso

It accomplished what it set out to do -- a relatively faithful retelling of William Desire Hodgson's Midnight Land but without the wretched pseudo-medieval prose that made the original almost unreadable in louse up of its brilliance of conceit.